Potential Cure for Lyme Disease

US Researchers Find an Antibody that Blocks the Tick-Borne Disease


Source:  Stock Image of Jogger and Dog In Woods

100% Effective in Lab Tests
If you love the outdoors and your pets, this new medical innovation is of great importance to you.  Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have discovered what they believe is an antibody that prevents ticks from spreading Lyme disease.  Lyme is a tick borne bacterial infection that can cause neurological problems if left untreated. The symptoms can be severe.  Some of the diseases that ticks carry are characterized as severe as malaria.  The disease comes from a tick that you picked up on your socks or clothing during a jog, walk through the woods or just petting your dog or cat.

Antidote
Until now there has been no cure for Lyme Disease.  UMASS has developed a "vaccine" in which antibodies are injected into a human that block the release of the Lyme disease bacteria that comes from a tick bite. In lab tests on mice the antibody is 100% effective.  The next issue is to cover the effectiveness in humans beyond a few weeks and into the whole tick season which lasts 7 to 8 months.

Next Steps
The team needs to do human trials.  They think it will take about 4 years to take this medical innovation into full commercial utilization.   For more news stories like this, go to "List of New Top Medical Innovations" at amazon.com/author/ekane  and ASIN: B07Q8WK98N for a free borrow or sample read.

Big Spreading Problem
Lyme Disease is spreading.  Just in the US, researchers believe there are 300,000 cases yearly. First spotted in New England, it's now moved to the mid-Atlantic and into the upper Midwest. What is so important is that this is a life-changing disease that you can pick up by a tick attaching to your socks or clothing as you jog or walk through the woods.

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