All Electric, Submarine Car: World 1st

All-Electric Submersible Convertible for Land and Sea

Source:  Rinspeed

Swiss Mobility Innovation
This is the ultimate, all-electric concept car for land and sea from Switzerland.  The sQuba is an all-electric vehicle that's the world's 1st fully submersible car that drives perfectly on land and underwater.  And, the travel from land to underwater is seamless.  It's a concept vehicle designed to demonstrate the future of mobility

Straight Out of James Bond 007
The car designer is Frank Rinderknecht and his Swiss team at the Swiss mobility lab Rinspeed.  Rinderknecht has been creating innovative concept cars for forty years. The inspiration for the sQuba comes from the Lotus submarine car "Wet Nellie" that James Bond 007 drove in the 1977 movie "The Spy Who Loves Me".  That car was pure fiction.  The sQuba is the real thing.

Submersible Convertible
The sQuba is powered by three electric motors charged by lithium ion batteries.  One e-motor provides propulsion on land and the two others power the vehicle underwater.  This is a submersible convertible, which Rinderknecht says keeps the vehicle much lighter and safer.  It's a two-seater and the driver and passenger breathe through compression air tanks.

Awesome Mobility Technology
The vehicle is capable of stabilized floating up to a depth of 33 feet.  Rinderknecht says the favorite features of the sQuba are the dive and floating underwater within the vehicle.  He calls it "an out of this world experience".  The sQuba is the most sought after concept car in the Rinspeed collection, particularly by movie makers and photographers.  It uniquely captures the future of mobility.
For a free sample look at my just published book "Hot Electric Vehicles for the 2020's", go to amazon.com/author/ekane   https://read.amazon.com/kp/embed?asin=B082GKV1ZY&preview=newtab&linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_TvP7DbAYF1AGD


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Important Innovations Collection: Breakthrough on CTE Brain Injuries from Sports

Developing EVs by Mass Producing E Batteries News

Your Brain, Lifetime Learning